Whole Wheat Pasta

It has been awhile since I have wanted to make this Whole Wheat Pasta.  After I made the Homemade Pasta last month, I bought a bag of whole wheat flour.  Well, it had been sitting there, in my pantry, until last Thursday.

After getting the rejection from Hubby about the Mahi-mahi, I asked Hubby what he would want for dinner.  His comment was, “I’m hungry.”  So, all right, fish is definitely out of the question.  I asked him if he would want some Jaegerschnitzel instead, but I reminded him that I didn’t have any mushrooms to go for the Jaegersosse.  He said, “That’s fine.”  Then I asked him if he thinks that the Whole Wheat Pasta would go with it.  And he said okay.

So I whipped out the recipe I got from Erica Lea’s blog, Cooking for Seven, and proceeded to dig out the whole wheat flour, egg, oil, and salt, and some water.  Thanks for sharing your recipe Erica!

I first measured out the flour and put it in a large mixing bowl.

Then I sprinkled the salt in…

I broke the two eggs into a small bowl and added the water to it.

Added the oil…

And lightly beat the egg/water/oil mixture with a fork…

Then I poured the beaten egg mixture into the flour bowl.

Then I used the same fork to mix it all up.

I floured my big cutting board with the same whole wheat flour.

And I dumped the dough on to it and I had fun kneading the dough for a good ten minutes.  Man, whole wheat flour is a lot tougher than the regular all-purpose flour.  So, I really got a good arms workout!

When it was all said and done, the dough became smoother and more pliable.  I let it rest for ten minutes before I started making the dough into noodle shapes.  I also covered it up with a piece of saran wrap, since I did not want the dough to dry out.

I cut the dough into fourths, according to the recipe.  Actually, the one fourths of dough was enough for two of us.

I used my rolling pin to flatten the dough out.  Man, I am telling you, I was afraid that I was going to break the handles of my rolling pin!  I had to really put pressure to get this whole wheat dough really thin!  I can see why a French rolling pin is preferable to this regular rolling pin.

Finally, I think I got it as flattened as I could.

I decided to try a different method that I saw a food blogger did, by rolling the dough into a tight roll instead of the three-fold letter method.  I was experimenting to see which noodle cutting method would be the best and quickest method for me.

I cut the dough roll into the noodle sizes that I wanted and then came the fun part… unraveling the noodles.  I have to tell you, that rolling the dough into a tight roll was not a good idea!  Because, then there are more noodle edges sticking to each other for me to unravel, and the noodles were so fragile.  So, it took me more time to unravel the noodles than the previous method I used, the three-fold letter one.

Let me show you the comparison by using the three-fold letter (this is just my term I use; I don’t know the “real” name of this methodology).  This is another piece of dough that I had flattened out and ready to cut into noodles.  First, I floured the surface of the dough, and then I folded the one third bottom part of the dough toward the middle.

Then I sprinkled some more flour onto the dough, and proceeded to fold the one-third top part of the dough toward me, and laid it on the first folded dough.  See, just like how you would fold a letter.

Then, I used my pastry cutter to cut them up into the size of noodles that I wanted.

On this batch, I was preparing the noodles to be frozen.  So, I unraveled the noodles (easily), and laid them straight on the cutting board on top of each other.

When I was done unraveling the noodles, then I just made them into a nest shape.  I pulled the top part of the noodles and brought it down toward the other end of the noodles and just lay them on the top of each other.

Then, I just put the nested noodles into a ziplock bag, and the noodles were ready to be frozen.

Now, back to the noodles we were going to eat.  Since we were going to eat the noodles that night, I just unraveled the noodles and laid them on top of each other.  This was how they looked.

Then I put them into a boiling pot of water…  Usually when the noodles float back on top of the water, it means they were done.  However, I cooked them a bit longer since we don’t like our noodles to be too chewy.

When it was done, I drained the noodle.

Served them into a plate!

Now, quite frankly, this whole wheat noodles did not taste as good as the all-purpose flour noodles… It was kind of tasteless to me, and even the chewiness factor was not like the all-purpose flour noodle.  Hmm… the price of being healthier…  But, since we ate it with the Jaegerschnitzel that has the jaegersosse or brown gravy, there was no sacrificing on our taste buds.  So in the end, it was a win-win situation for our taste buds and tummy.   :)

Happy eating!

Print recipe here.

Whole Wheat Pasta
Recipe from: Cooking for Seven

Ingredients:

2 1/3 cups traditional (12 5/8 oz) or white (11 5/8 oz) whole wheat flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1/3 cup water
1 teaspoon olive oil

Directions:

Hand Method

1. In a large bowl stir together 2 cups of the flour and the salt. Make a well in the center.
2. In a small mixing bowl, combine eggs, water and olive oil. Add the flour mixture and mix well.
3. Sprinkle the kneading surface with remaining 1/3 cup flour. Turn dough out onto floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 8-10 minutes. Cover and let rest for 10 minutes.
4. Divide dough into fourths. On a lightly floured surface roll each third of dough into a 1/16 inch thick square about 12×12 inches. Cut as desired. Or follow the manufacturer’s instructions for using a pasta machine to roll and cut the dough.

Mixer method

1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the flour and salt. Make a well in the center.
2. In a small bowl, combine the eggs, water and olive oil. Add to the flour mixture. With the dough hook, mix until well combined.
3. With the mixer running, add the remaining flour. With the mixer on low, knead until smooth and elastic, about 8-10 minutes. Cover and let rest for 10 minutes.
4. Divide dough into fourths. On a lightly floured surface roll each third of dough into a 1/16 inch thick square about 12×12 inches. Cut as desired. Or follow the manufacturer’s instructions for using a pasta machine to roll and cut the dough.

Your can use this pasta immediately, or dry on racks for later use. It should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer, as there are raw eggs in the dough.

Makes about 1 pound of fresh pasta.

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